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Itinerary:

Quiet Paddle in Central Pennsylvania

This calm quiet stretch of river is great for beginners and those wishing to try out stand up paddle boarding. Leisurely paddle downstream in the last miles of the Northern Susquehanna while viewing wildlife and history along the banks.

As you paddle south, you can see Fort McClure on your right, which was stockaded and provided security and shelter for residents in the late 1700s. 

Around mile 146 you will see the abandoned Reading Railroad Bridge, where the remnants of the North Branch Canal begin. Down to mile 139, you will be able to see the remaining structures of canal locks, the towpath, and aqueducts. 

All along this route, you will be able to see wildlife on both sides of the river. Be on the lookout for bald eagles, herons, waterfowl, beaver, and river otters, among others. 

*Note: All islands along this route are privately owned, so please do not stop on them.

Thank you to Susquehanna Greenway for contributing to this itinerary. To read more about this paddle trip, visit Susquehanna Greenway.

Nearest Hospital:

Geisinger Medical Center
100 N Academy Ave
Danville, PA 17822
(570) 271-6211

Water Safety

Remember: safe use of rivers and any designated trails, at any time, is your responsibility! Water trail maps are for informational and interpretive purposes only and are not meant for navigational purposes, nor do they take into account level of skills or ability required to navigate rivers. The National Park Service, Chesapeake Conservancy and/or the individual trail associations assume no responsibility or liability for any injury or loss resulting directly or indirectly from the use of water trails, maps or other printed or web-based materials. Learn more about water safety.

Image Credit: Nicholas A. Tonelli

Water Safety

Remember: safe use of rivers and any designated trails, at any time, is your responsibility! Water trail maps are for informational and interpretive purposes only and are not meant for navigational purposes, nor do they take into account level of skills or ability required to navigate rivers. The National Park Service, Chesapeake Conservancy and/or the individual trail associations assume no responsibility or liability for any injury or loss resulting directly or indirectly from the use of water trails, maps or other printed or web-based materials. Learn more about water safety.